family, mental illness

The Hard Truths

Goodness knows I wish I didn’t have to face the hard truths. If there was a place I could hide from them I’d probably be there right now. Our daughter is not doing well. She isn’t getting any better. I’d like to protest and remember all the progress she had made. I’d like to remember the years where she was stable. I’d like to believe she is improving. Unfortunately that is not the truth of things. Her hallucinations are becoming stronger. I feel like our girl is slipping further and further away from us.

Mary is about to switch into a longer term residential facility. It will start with a 45 day diagnostic placement. Based on the recommendations of the program, she will stay with them for up to a year. We were lucky enough to get this residential school through an IEP. Without that we surely wouldn’t be able to afford this treatment. What we need is the truth of things. Will this next step help our Mary?

I also think we need to face a harder truth. Is there ANY treatment that would help Mary? Would anything else keep her safe at home? The answer is probably not. I think this truth is made so much harder by the fact that we had a few good years. She was relatively stable. She was relatively safe, at least physically.

I find myself seeking truths from other blogs. Does anyone else have a child who hallucinates voices that want her to hurt people? What do people do with children who are so mentally ill that they can never be left alone? Ever? People send me words of encouragement and I appreciate it. People also send some rather strange advice. I mean we have obviously tried in-home intensive treatment and every possible combination of outpatient programs, medication, and therapeutic strategies. (It seems unlikely that your magic oil will prevent Mary from stockpiling knives and trying to capture her brother alone in his room. I like essential oils but they are not a safety measure by any means.)

Truth is an evasive thing. I used to think almost anything could be found on the internet. This is not so. I simply cannot find stories of families like ours. Where are all the other parents of children with developmental trauma or attachment issues or Bipolar Disorder? Have they found any treatment that works? Or are we simply alone? This truth is a hard truth for me.

They are silent. Families like ours are silent in the truth of their struggles. They are silent about what they endure or how they fight against their child’s demons. I can find a hundred blogs about families with physically ill children. They are applauded for speaking their truth through the tribulations of cancer, diabetes, and rare genetic diseases. Not so for the parents of children facing mental illness. We are left in shadow and told to be quiet about our experiences. There is a shameful stigma to this kind of thing. People would rather not face this truth.

So I share our story. I don’t want others to feel alone on this road. It’s a difficult one but it exists for more children than just our daughter. We got hard news today in a meeting with the clinical director from the new residential school. They have an amazing, cutting edge program based on the latest research around complex trauma. However they don’t have good news. For a case like Mary’s the results are mixed. Many kids who are this dangerous need years of residential treatment to go home, if they ever can. Even the best treatment cannot work if she won’t try.

I have no answers. I have only truth. Only our truth. I share it with you so that hopefully some of you feel less alone.

**Names have been changed to protect the privacy of those involved.

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adoption, family

While She is Gone

So many things happen while she is gone. There are birthdays, holidays, and family outings. There is so much lost time. And yet, I ask myself: what really happens while she is gone?

Mary has been at a psychiatric residential treatment facility (PRTF) for 5 months. People will ask me, “Do you get to see her?” Yes, of course we get to see her. She isn’t in jail. We have visits and day trips and we’ve even made it up to almost 8 hours at home on a handful of occasions. Ok, maybe just 2 occasions, but we are working on it. It’s just not enough.

Luke and I travel the hour drive one-way to see her about 3 times a week. Once is for a day-trip visit. once is for a family therapy session at the PRTF. The third is for an attachment-focused therapy session “off-grounds” with a psychologist. This last one is the ONLY therapy session in which she will participate. I’m almost certain the psychologist is part wizard.

In the PRTF session she mostly screams at the clinician, Mrs. T. Mary runs away, laughs uncontrollably and then smashes things during Mrs. T’s sessions. Afterwards she asks me to take her to lunch as if nothing has happened. Instead, I’ve begun to call in for the PRTF sessions because nothing beneficial is happening during that time.

Mrs. T has decided that whatever happens in therapy will be Mary’s choice but if she won’t go to session her “level” will drop. So Mary goes and sits in the room. She screams and slams things. Mrs. T assures her they will only talk about what Mary wants to talk about. They will only do what Mary wants to do. Not being a therapist herself, Mary makes some interesting choices. She chooses a lot of yelling and foul language at said clinician. Eventually she colors some pictures about why she hates therapy. Mrs. T praises Mary and sends her on her way.

I know they care about Mary at the PRTF. Mrs. T wants her to do well. Everyone wants Mary to improve. Everyone except Mary. Maybe she is too scared to try. So all of us keep trying while she is away. Mrs. T acquiesces and cajoles to no effect.

Not so with Dr. P, the off-grounds psychologist. He calls Mary out for her avoidance tactics. He lets her know that mom and dad will go to lunch and she will stay behind if she won’t participate. After all, it’s her session. She has to finish it but we do not. Oddly, she isn’t upset by this. Instead, she responds fully. He somehow magically draws her out of her shell. She would never scream at him. So Luke and I attend this weekly session together, every week. Dr. P has Mary sit in between us to “feel the love all around her.”

Dr. P has many insights into why it’s so hard for Mary to share Mom. He is very, very good. I still spend so much time wondering: what is really happening with her? How much progress is really taking place while she is there? While she is gone, we are all safe. Are we really accomplishing anything else?

Because life is happening while she is gone. Our family is healing while she is gone. The world continues while she is gone.

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**Names have been changed to protect the privacy of those involved.

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